Cookbook Review & Recipe for Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

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Anyone out there have a picky kid to contend with?  Even though I don’t have kids of my own yet, my niece is at my house all the time.  (I love it because I get to spend time with her, and she loves it because we hang out and watch classics like The Little Mermaid and make yummy snacks like Oatmeal Raisin Cookies.  ;) ) 

And even though she isn’t a teenager yet (she’s only 7…but she’s the only 7 year old I’ve ever known who will repeatedly order fish and sautéed veggies off a menu over chicken fingers and fries without any adult persuasion), she and I were both excited when I recently received a copy of Matthew Locricchio’s Teen Cuisine.

Tomato & Cheese Lunch Pie

This is a great cookbook for teens just starting to get involved in cooking.  The recipes have straightforward, easy to follow instructions, fairly short ingredient lists, and are pretty healthy.  Plus every recipe has its own gorgeous, full-page color picture.  Looking through it with my niece, she pointed out at least 10 recipes that she wanted to try soon, including Fresh Fruit Tostados, Tomato & Cheese Lunch Pie, Green Goddess Dressing, Po-Boy Sandwich, Spaghetti and Meatballs with Fresh Tomato Sauce, Alabama Festival Shrimp, and Chocolate Fondue. 

Cheese & Chocolate Fondues 

The only thing my niece wished was different about the book was that there were more vegetable side dish recipes…and she’s right, the only veggie sides in the book are Quick-Cooked Greens, Mashed Potatoes with Roasted Garlic Butter, Crisp Oven Fries, and Black Beans.  (And even the salad section of this book only has four different salads.)  She and I both would have liked to see a bit more veggie variety.

The Burger & Crisp Oven Fries

Alabama Festival Shrimp 

In addition to the recipes, there are a few other helpful resources in this book, including a section on kitchen safety, a section on kitchen essentials (basically a glossary of ingredients, including applicable substitutions, geared toward teens), a metric conversion chart, and a diagramed list of kitchen equipment and utensils.  Can you see why I think this book is pretty amazing for teens?  I can’t think of a better way to get kids eating healthy, thinking creatively, and becoming excited about learning things like math and chemistry.

Quinoa & Black Bean Salad with Fresh Orange Dressing 

After looking through the book, my niece and I chose to make the Oatmeal Raisin Cookies first.  It was a rainy afternoon and we had a couple movies to watch and board games to play…and making cookies just felt right.  The cookies ended up being delicious…flavorful and chewy, and paired with a glass of milk it really doesn’t get much better.  I made a few changes to the original recipe so I’m sharing my version here.

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies (Adapted from Matthew Locricchio’s recipe in Teen Cuisine; published by Marshall Cavendish)

(Yield:  About 3 dozen cookies)

1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 1/4 cups light brown sugar, lightly packed

1 large egg plus 1 large egg white

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

1/2 cup whole wheat flour

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon freshly grated ground nutmeg

2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1/2 cup raisins (I use golden raisins)

Preheat oven to 350F and line baking sheets with parchment paper or silpat liners. 

Cream together butter and brown sugar in a large bowl, then stir in egg, egg white, and vanilla.  In a medium bowl, whisk together flours, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.  Slowly stir dry ingredients into wet until just combined.  Fold in oats, walnuts, and raisins.

Use a 1 1/2 tablespoon measure to scoop the dough; arrange it on the prepared baking sheets, leaving about 2 inches between each cookie.  Bake until the edges are browned and starting to crisp (if you’re cooking 2 trays double-stacked it takes about 18 minutes; check the cookies about 5 minutes earlier if you’re only cooking 1 tray at a time), flipping the trays once halfway through.  Let the cookies cool on the baking sheets before removing.

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Comments

  1. says

    I’ve finally found oats around here… I’m so excited now I can make oatmeal cookies, they are my favorite kind. Thanks for sharing the recipe, I’ve left my cookie cookbook in the US!

  2. says

    There really isn’t much better than a chewy oatmeal cookie and a big glass of milk on a rainy day! The book looks great, and the cookies sound delicious. I can see why your niece was excited!

  3. says

    sounds like an interesting cookbook. Good gift for teens!
    Raisin and oatmeal? I love both of them so I must like that cookie too! :)

  4. says

    Hi Faith i am back on air! These cookies look perfect not only for teenagers but also for adults who have a heart of a teenager, like me for example lol.

  5. says

    She sounds like a pretty awesome 7 year old! I’m hoping my little lady is a good and adventurous eater. We shall see. The Alabama Festival Shrimp from this book looks amazing! And I always enjoy a good oatmeal cookie. I like the big puffy kind though vs. the thinner/crispier (Josh like the thin/crispy for milk).

  6. says

    Your niece sounds like she’s 7 going on 27! Good for her! A gal that loves fish and veggies? Love it! :) I love that they include metric conversions. I think that’s one thing kids don’t learn any more! I always knew there were 3 teaspoons in a tablespoon…I learned it in grade school!! ;)

  7. says

    What a great concept for a cookbook. I know some adults who could use the same help. Maybe they could call it “Teen (and Adults Who Can’t Cook) Cuisine” :) But seriously, the dishes look really great and I’m sure it would be fun for any teenager to get in the kitchen and feel responsible for making them all from scratch.

  8. says

    Oh dear, your niece is a child after my heart. Can I borrow her for a couple days to show my kiddies how to really enjoy food? That is so great that she eats so many varieties of food. You’re right, cookbook sounds like the perfect cookbook for the beginning teenage cook. Heck, I’d love this book! Your cookies look delicious and lovely. Perfect with a cold glass of milk.

  9. says

    Hi Faith,

    Your photography is pretty amazing!And the idea of showing the cookbook page as a photo in itself is very clever!! I might steal this little technique of yours if you don’t mind :) :)

  10. says

    I love hearing about your time spent with your neice. She is so lucky to have you as an aunt and it’s obvious you feel the same way about her. The cookies sound like a lovely way to spend an afternoon with her and gave a delicious reward, judging by the looks of those beauties!

  11. says

    Oatmeal raisin cookie, a classic. It is very promising to see a healthy 7 year old kind interested in good eating. Tell your niece we are proud of her.

  12. says

    I love the vibrant colors of that cookbook! I have to admit that I don’t usually follow all the recipes in a cookbook, but use them to marvel over the lovely food pictures.

  13. says

    I don’t have a picky child, but I have a husband who can be quite picky. HAH!
    For instance, he likes oatmeal cookies, but he doesn’t like raisins. I know, go figure. ;)

  14. says

    This book sounds awesome.Whatever I m seeing looks so so good.I love the thin cookies that u ve made.Wish could have some :)

  15. says

    great review of an interesting cookbook, faith! the cookies are made no less than 324% better by the use of golden raisins. :)

  16. Pat R says

    The pictures are fantastic and the cookies look scrumptious……I’m always looking for “THE” oatmeal cookie; I haven’t found it yet…maybe this is “THE” one.

  17. says

    That is a really great book, perfect for getting the teens into the kitchen. I did not need help but many do. Love the safety and explanation section too. Yumm…oatmeal cookie, so basic yet comforting.

  18. says

    I think it’s wonderful that kids are learning to cook and bake earlier these days! Heck, I sure wasn’t making cookies like that when I was 7… Very impressive! ;)

  19. says

    Love this book review Faith. i have never heard of it, but the recipes sound wonderful. LOVE that you cook with your niece. Those are memories of great times together that you will both remember forever. The cookies look great! Have a wonderful weekend :) xo

  20. says

    First of all, your niece sounds adorable! And I love that she loves veggies. TOO CUTE.

    Second of all…oatmeal raisin just happen to be my FAVORITE cookies! And these look perfect!

  21. says

    I just had a fruit salad since morning and looking at all those pics in that book is just making me SO SO SO hungry !!
    My cookies never look nice and plat, I am guessing because I add less butter .. i am going to follow your recipe point by point next time :)

  22. says

    This sounds like such a great book…my 14 yr old niece lives with me and although she is not too picky (in fact she is my taste tester), she knows nothing about cooking and I would love to get her deeper than the eating stage :)
    The cookies look pretty good too :)

  23. says

    Truth be known I could live off vegetable side dishes! The book looks great – my teenage nephew has been learning to cook and I bet he would love it. The cookies are yumminess too!

  24. says

    This book looks great! Something I know my friends and I would enjoy – and those cookies look incredibly addictive :)

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