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This Balsamic Spiced Concord Grape Jam Recipe features sweet and aromatic Concord grapes, and is balanced with a touch of balsamic vinegar and accented with a hint of warm spices.

I live for Concord grapes.

If you’ve never had Concords you’re probably thinking, Really, Faith? Grapes?

They’re good in a “meh, it’s a fruit and I should get my daily quota” kind-of-way. But nothing spectacular. Barely worth a cursory glance.

Those are normal grapes, and Concords are nothing approaching normal grapes.

Concord grapes are in a class all their own.

What do Concord Grapes Taste Like?

They are a stunning dark purplish/bluish/blackish color, and are perfumed with a wonderfully sweet and fruity aroma.

Biting into a Concord grape, they’re both sweet and slightly tart with a crisp, clean flavor. They taste intensely like grape. Real, pure, grape nectar. If you’re a fan of 100% grape juice, it’s like that, only infinitely better.

Fresh Concord Grapes Off the Vine

Concord grape picking in Western New York.

Here in Western New York, I live not too far from grape country. Welch’s actually has a museum and vineyards within less than an hour’s drive.

Every year I go grape picking with my family and there is absolutely nothing better than Concord grapes eaten straight off the vine!

What to Make with Concord Grapes

Last year I made Concord Grape Juice and Concord Grape Jam, which I later used to make Grape Jam Bars in a Jar. Or you could use the jam to fill homemade doughnuts. And Concord Grape Cobbler is another delicious looking treat to try.

And of course this Balsamic Spiced Concord Grape Jam Recipe is perfect to make with fresh Concords!

Concord Grape Jam Recipe with Description

Balsamic Spiced Concord Grape Jam Recipe

This year I felt like playing with the flavor profile of my grape jam with the addition of balsamic vinegar and warm spices.

Balsamic might seem like a strange choice, but it’s also made from grapes and it’s tart, rich flavor is a nice balance to the sweetness of fresh Concord grapes.

Additionally, note that for this recipe, I didn’t pulse the grape skins in a food processor like I normally would. I wanted my jam to have more noticeable larger pieces of fruit!

How to Tell When Jam is Done

There are three easy, reliable methods to help you determine when jam is done:

  1. The Temperature Test: The jam should be at 220F (this is the magic number if you’re at sea level, like me). A cheapie candy thermometer works fine here.
  2. The Sheet Test:  Dip a wooden spoon into the jam and hold it sideways over the pot. The jam should fall off in a sheet, or the last jam to drip off should hang off the spoon in a bulging drop but not fall.
  3. The Freezer Test: Freeze a plate, then put a little jam onto the frozen plate and put it back into the freezer for a few minutes. The jam should gel and not run.

More Jam Recipes to Try:

Did you make this recipe? Please rate it and leave a comment below because I love hearing from you! You can also tag @anediblemosaic on social media. To stay up-to-date FOLLOW ME on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Xoxo, Faith

Balsamic Spiced Concord Grape Jam Recipe

5 from 2 votes
Prep Time15 minutes
Cook Time1 hour
Yields: 44 servings
This Balsamic Spiced Concord Grape Jam Recipe features sweet and aromatic Concord grapes, and is balanced with a touch of balsamic vinegar and accented with a hint of warm spices.

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Ingredients
 

Instructions
 

  • Slip the skins off the grapes and set aside for now.
  • Transfer the grape insides to a heavy-bottomed, lidded 5-quart pot. Cover the pot, bring to a simmer over medium heat, and simmer 10 minutes. Turn heat off and cool to room temperature (this will take up to a couple hours). Transfer the grape insides to a cheesecloth-lined sieve fitted over a bowl to catch the liquid; gently wring the cheesecloth to extract as much liquid as possible.
  • Transfer the grape liquid back to the pot along with the grape skins, sugar, lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, cinnamon, cloves, salt, and black pepper. Bring to a boil over high heat (uncovered), then turn heat down and simmer (uncovered) until jam is done (using one of the three tests), about 30 to 35 minutes, stirring frequently.
  • Transfer the jam to sterile jars; the jars should be preserved through canning or stored in the refrigerator.

Notes

  • Recipe adapted from my recipe for Concord Grape Jam.
  • This recipe makes about 5 1/2 cups of jam, which is about 44 (2-tablespoon) servings.
  • Washing the Grapes: Wash the grapes before you de-stem them, but weigh them after (so you don't include the weight of the stems).

How to Tell When Jam is Done

There are three easy, reliable methods to help you determine when jam is done:
  1. The Temperature Test: The jam should be at 220F (this is the magic number if you’re at sea level, like me). A cheapie candy thermometer works fine here.
  2. The Sheet Test:  Dip a wooden spoon into the jam and hold it sideways over the pot. The jam should fall off in a sheet, or the last jam to drip off should hang off the spoon in a bulging drop but not fall.
  3. The Freezer Test: Freeze a plate, then put a little jam onto the frozen plate and put it back into the freezer for a few minutes. The jam should gel and not run.

Nutrition

Serving: 2tablespoons | Calories: 75kcal | Carbohydrates: 19g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 14mg | Potassium: 60mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 19g | Vitamin A: 20IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 4mg | Iron: 1mg

Nutritional information is automatically calculated and should be used as an approximate.

Course: Condiments
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Concord Grape Jam, Concord Grape Jam Recipe

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Concord Grape Jam Recipe Pin

This post was first published on An Edible Mosaic on October 18, 2012. I updated it with more information on September 23, 2020.

Disclosure: This post contains Amazon affiliate links to products I believe in, which means that even though it doesn’t cost you anything extra, I will receive a small amount of money from the sale of these items. Thank you for helping to support An Edible Mosaic!

Faith, author of An Edible Mosaic.
About Faith

I’m the writer, recipe developer, photographer, and food stylist behind this blog. I love finding the human connection through something we all do every day: eat! Food is a common ground that we can all relate to, and our tables tell a story. It’s my goal to inspire you to get in the kitchen, try something new, and find a favorite you didn’t know you had.

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Recipe Rating




26 Comments

  1. This was amazing. My grapes are quite small so tedious peeling but well worth it. Can I double the batch? I found it still quite sweet so could I cut down the sugar? Who knew that balsamic vinegar would be so great in this recipe, not to mention the cinnamon and cloves. LOVE IT!!

    1. Lee Day, Thank you so much for your comment, I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe! Yes, you can definitely double the batch.

      Sugar in jam serves two purposes: 1) sweetener, and also 2) helps it set. I haven’t tried this recipe with less sugar, so my only concern would be it setting properly. But with that being said, I think there might be a little wiggle room. If you want to experiment with it, I would reduce the sugar to 2 1/2 cups (instead of the 3 cups that the recipe calls for), but I would’t add less than that. If you give it a try, let me know how it goes! :)

  2. Michele Mueller says:

    5 stars
    Absolutely delicious. I made this last year with our freshly harvested Concord grapes and it was superb. We gave out jars to the fam and everyone raved. This year we’re making it with 9lbs worth! I can’t wait to have this back in the pantry. The one addition we make, because my hubs and I don’t like chunky bits, we usually food process the skins to a pulp before adding them back. Otherwise I follow it to the letter and again just so good. Thanks for sharing. 🍇 ❤️

  3. 5 stars
    I was looking for a more interesting grape jam this year and this is it. I used grapes from my yard that have the qualities of concord grapes. This is going to be a great gift.

  4. Susan Gale says:

    Approximately how much liquid is needed as opposed to the 3 pounds of concord grapes? A family member thought he would help me and removed the skins and boiled the grapes. Thanks

    1. Hi Susan, This recipe doesn’t call for added liquid; the liquid here comes from the grapes.

  5. I just want to say that I love this jam! I’m canning my second batch. I am wondering if it’s okay to reduce the amount of sugar?

    1. Becca, I’m so happy to hear you’re enjoying this jam! It’s one of my favorites too, especially this time of year. I’m the same way, I’m always thinking about whether or not I can reduce the amount of sugar in a recipe. The purpose of sugar in jam isn’t just to provide sweetness though – it also helps the jam “set” (notice there is no additional pectin added to the recipe, other than what is naturally found in the fruit), and sugar also helps preserve the fruit. I haven’t tried this jam with a reduced amount of sugar, but you may be able to reduce it by a bit; I’m just not sure how much of a reduction will still yield a “set” jam. It might be helpful to do a quick search online for a reduced-sugar concord grape jam recipe. I hope this helps!

  6. When the grapes are out of season, could you possibly use juice?

    1. Mari, Thanks so much for your question! This particular recipe is for jam – it uses both the insides and the skins of grapes. Pectin levels are quite different in whole fruits rather than fruit juice, so if you want to use grape juice instead, I think a jelly recipe might yield better results. I hope this helps!

  7. really, other grapes just don’t compare to concords. you’re so right. this jam is lovely in appearance and flavor too, no doubt!

  8. I remember last years recipes and I cant believe its a year ago. The balsamic here would be heavenly with your favourite grapes.

  9. Thank you for describing concord grapes, now I really hope I have a chance to taste them some time. I do like grapes but those sound special. Now I see why you love them so much! Love this twist on your jam, with the balsamic. Nice touch!

  10. Evelyne@cheapethniceatz says:

    I remember how much you talked about these grapes from last year lol. I really like this special version of the jam..balsamic is so perfect for such an instance.

  11. So simple jelly is, but so rewarding. I don’t think we give grape jelly a lot of thought, growing up with it, but this spicy balsamic concord grape jelly makes me appreciate jelly all over again.

  12. Love the balsamic, cinnamon and cloves in your recipe Faith – wish we had concord grapes around here so I could give this a whirl.

  13. Blond Duck says:

    It sounds delicious!

  14. Concord grapes are stunning! I live in the town they were developed, Concord, MA, so the name is meant to be capitalized. They aren’t grown as a commercial crop here, though. Love the recipe! Their flavor can stand up to a lot of spice, and citrus too. I make a fab spiced Concord grape conserve with orange and lemon slices. Can’t wait to try yours, though it will be next year.

  15. I love those photos too Faith! I think you get the best Concord grapes – our harvest was a bit bitter this year. I want some of that jam!

  16. BeadedTail says:

    I bet that’s delicious on warm muffins on a cold morning!

  17. Such a beautiful jam Faith!

  18. I only had my first taste of real Concord grapes a month or so ago, and I totally get the hype! They really are different from table grapes altogether. I really liked the “Thomcord” grapes from Trader Joe’s, which were a cross between Concord and Thompson grapes, giving them that wonderful flavor but without seeds. Such a shame that their season seems to have passed already.

    1. Hannah, So true, it’s such a short-lived time of bliss! :)

  19. I love grapes- all grapes! I can’t even buy them because the bag will magically disappear :) Homemade jam sounds amazing

  20. Amy (Savory Moments) says:

    Mmmmmm… this jam looks lovely. I love the warm spices you’ve included in it. I like Concord grapes, too. I’ve been meaning to buy a bunch before they are gone because I want to make a grape pie.

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