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Flaky golden pastry filled with a sweet, aromatic almond center make Banketstaaf an irresistible treat. You can make it with store-bought puff pastry, and use store-bought or homemade marzipan. It’s a classic Dutch Christmas pastry that’s perfect with a cup of coffee any time of year!

marzipan puff pastry

During high school I worked at a local pizzeria. It was by far the most fun job I’ve ever had.

Not only because I loved the frantic pace when it got super busy, as it had a tendency to do on holidays and weekends (really, no joke, I loved it when it got insanely, hectically busy!).

But also because I got to work with some fantastic people. One of my favorite co-workers was named Joan, and she was a real character.

She worked mostly on the slicer, efficiently churning out vat after vat of thin, perfectly sliced onions, tomatoes, turkey breasts, and other luncheon meats. Joan was, shall I say, a woman of a certain age. She had snow white hair and pronounced the word wash as “warsh”, but her age didn’t impede her sense of humor.

top view of dutch almond pastry showing flaky layers

I still remember listening flabbergasted to some of the stories Joan told about what she and her hubby used to do on hot summer afternoons. (Yeah, I’m pretty sure I wasn’t nearly old enough for that kind of talk, lol.)

One of my favorite things about Joan was that on Sunday mornings she would bring in some kind of pastry for breakfast.

Sometimes it was cheese danishes, sometimes apple fritters.

dutch banket recipe

But on very lucky mornings it was almond pastries, which were basically marzipan-filled puff pastry with sliced almonds on top (aka Banketstaaf!). I’ve been dying for this pastry and incidentally, this is the perfect time to share it, as it is a classic Dutch Christmas food.

With flaky, buttery puff pastry and sweet almond marzipan, this easy Banketstaaf pastry is perfect paired with a cup of coffee on any morning. Don’t wait until Christmas to make it!

overhead view of baketstaaf pastry on parchment paper cut into slices

What You’ll Love About This Recipe

  • Homemade marzipan. If you love almonds and you’ve never tried making homemade marzipan, let me tell you 2 things: 1) it’s so easy to make it’s ridiculous, and 2) when it comes to flavor and texture, homemade marzipan blows store-bought out of the water! The intense sweet almond aroma and flavor of homemade marzipan captivating in this Dutch pastry.
  • This recipe is forgiving. If you need to use store-bought marzipan (or store-bought almond paste), it will still work. Your pastry will still be incredible. It just won’t be quite as incredible as it would be with homemade marzipan.
  • Store-bought puff pastry makes it easy. Frozen puff pastry from the store works perfectly here (it bakes up flaky and golden!), and is a huge time-saver.
  • Quick and easy. All things said and done, this delicious treat takes less than an hour from start-to-finish to whip up. (Even if you make homemade marzipan!) It’s perfect for a special morning or any day you want a special treat.

Banket Recipe Ingredients and Substitutions

Ingredients Explained

In this section I explain the ingredients and give substitution ideas where applicable. For the full recipe (including the ingredient amounts), see the recipe card below.

Homemade Marzipan Ingredients

Remember, you don’t have to make your own marzipan! This is completely optional; you can use store-bought marzipan or almond paste instead.

  • Granulated sugar
  • Water
  • Almond flour
  • Egg whites
  • Salt
  • Almond extract
  • Powdered sugar

Ingredients for Marzipan Dutch Pastry

banketstaaf ingredients
  • Marzipan – you can use the recipe for homemade marzipan in the recipe card below, or get store-bought marzipan or almond paste
  • Puff pastry – look for this in the frozen aisle of the grocery store
  • All-purpose flour – you only need a little bit of flour to roll out the puff pastry
  • Egg + water – for the egg wash (it gives the pastry a golden color)
  • Sliced almonds – for the top
  • Granulated sugar – this is for the top along with the sliced almonds; I like it because it adds a festive “snowy” look to the pastry

Instructions

how to make dutch banketstaaf with puff pastry and marzipan
  1. Unfold the puff pastry onto a lightly floured surface. Lightly sprinkle the top with flour, and roll it out to an 11 by 13-inch rectangle. Cut the rectangle in half the long way so that you end up with two 5 1/2 by 13-inch rectangles. Divide the marzipan into 2 equal portions and roll each into a log about 10 1/2 inches long. Place a marzipan log onto the center of a puff pastry rectangle, and lightly brush eggwash along the edges of the pastry.
  2. Gently but firmly fold the pastry ends up over the marzipan, then start at one end and roll up the marzipan in the puff pastry. Repeat this process with the other marzipan log and puff pastry rectangle. Put the logs onto the prepared baking sheet (seam side down) and refrigerate 20 minutes. 
  3. Lightly brush the pastries with eggwash (discard the extra eggwash). Sprinkle the sliced almonds and sugar on top.
  4. Bake until the pastry is puffed and golden, about 22 minutes. (Don’t worry if a little marzipan oozes out while cooking.) 
classic dutch christmas food

Storage and Reheating

Store Banketstaaf wrapped well at room for up to 2 days, or in the fridge for up to 1 week.

You don’t have to reheat leftover Banket before eating. However, if you prefer it warm or want to re-crisp the pastry, put it on a baking tray and bake at 350F until warm, about 8 minutes.

Tips for Making Banketstaaf aka Dutch Christmas Log

  • If you have the time, make homemade marzipan. Your Banketstaaf will have the richest almond flavor and aroma, and a texture that just melts in your mouth.
  • Of course you can make homemade puff pastry, but if you use store-bought your pastry won’t suffer for it. Store-bought puff pastry bakes up to crisp, flaky, buttery perfection. Just make sure you don’t leave your puff pastry out too long when thawing it. As soon as it’s no longer frozen, transfer it to the fridge until you’re reading to roll it out and make the Banketstaaf. Otherwise, you run the risk of your pastry not puffing!
  • It’s easy to re-crisp leftover Banketstaaf. Simply place the pastry on a baking tray and bake at 350F until warm, about 8 minutes.
top view of dutch christmas pastry on cutting board with greenery

Banketstaaf FAQs

Where is Banketstaaf From?

Banketstaaf is a traditional Dutch pastry from the Netherlands.

What is the Difference Between Marzipan and Almond Paste?

Almond paste has more almonds and less sugar than marzipan. Additionally, almond paste has a coarser texture and holds up better when baked.

You can read more about the difference between marzipan and almond paste on All Recipes.

dutch christmas log recipe

Do I Have to Make Homemade Marzipan to Make This Dutch Pastry?

No! In a time crunch, you can use store-bought marzipan to make Banketstaff.

Additionally, you can use store-bought almond paste to make this pastry if you can’t find marzipan. However, if you do so, the end result will be a bit less sweet. Additionally, because almond paste holds up better than marzipan when baked, the pastry filling will likely still hold its log shape.

More Christmas Treats to Make

christmas in netherlands food almond pastry

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Banketstaaf Recipe (Christmas Dutch Almond Pastry)

5 from 1 vote
Prep Time20 minutes
Cook Time30 minutes
Yields: 20 servings
Flaky golden pastry filled with a sweet, aromatic almond center make Banketstaaf an irresistible treat. You can make it with store-bought puff pastry, and use store-bought or homemade marzipan. It's a classic Dutch Christmas pastry that's perfect with a cup of coffee any time of year!

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Ingredients
 

Homemade Marzipan (yields about 3 1/2 cups):

Marzipan Pastry Logs:

Instructions
 

For the Homemade Marzipan:

  • Add the sugar and water to a 3-quart pot over medium heat. (You can swirl the pot, but don’t stir it.) Cook until it reaches 230F on a candy thermometer.
  • Stir in the almond flour, egg whites, and salt, and cook 3 minutes, stirring constantly.
  • Remove from the heat and stir in the almond extract.
  • Immediately strain through a mesh sieve into a large bowl to remove any pieces of egg white that may have scrambled.
  • Gradually stir in the powdered sugar.
  • The marzipan will reach a moldable consistency, like a slightly softer version of Play-Doh (it will harden more as it cools).
  • Once cooled, you can use the marzipan immediately or store it at room temperature for about a month.

For the Marzipan Pastry Logs:

  • Preheat the oven to 425F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or silpat liners.
  • Unfold the puff pastry onto a lightly floured surface. Lightly sprinkle the top with flour, and roll it out to an 11 by 13-inch rectangle.
  • Cut the rectangle in half the long way so that you end up with two 5 1/2 by 13-inch rectangles.
  • Divide the marzipan into 2 equal portions and roll each into a log about 10 1/2 inches long.
  • Place a marzipan log onto the center of a puff pastry rectangle, and lightly brush eggwash along the edges of the pastry.
  • Gently but firmly fold the pastry ends up over the marzipan, then start at one end and roll up the marzipan in the puff pastry.
  • Repeat this process with the other marzipan log and puff pastry rectangle.
  • Put the logs onto the prepared baking sheet (seam side down) and refrigerate 20 minutes.
  • Lightly brush the pastries with eggwash (discard the extra eggwash). Sprinkle the sliced almonds and sugar on top.
  • Bake until the pastry is puffed and golden, about 22 minutes. (Don’t worry if a little marzipan oozes out while cooking.)
  • Resist its heavenly smell and let the pastries cool before slicing and serving.

Notes

  • Recipe Yield and Serving Size: This recipe makes 2 pastry logs. Cut each log into 10 slices; 1 slice is 1 serving.
  • You Don’t Have to Use Homemade Marzipan: If you do, your Banketstaaf will have the richest almond flavor and aroma, and a texture that just melts in your mouth. However, in a time crunch, you can use store-bought marzipan to make Banketstaff. Additionally, you can use store-bought almond paste to make this pastry if you can’t find marzipan. However, if you do so, the end result will be a bit less sweet. Additionally, because almond paste holds up better than marzipan when baked, the pastry filling will likely still hold its log shape.
  • To Store Marzipan: Wrap it tightly in plastic wrap, and then place it in an airtight container. When you want to use it, knead it a little and it should be moldable once again. If it dries up a bit, you can knead in egg white 1 tablespoon at a time until it reaches your desired consistency. If you add egg white, just remember it must be used immediately since the egg isn’t being cooked.
  • If Using Frozen Puff Pastry: Thaw it at room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes before using. Just make sure you don’t leave your puff pastry out too long when thawing it. As soon as it’s no longer frozen, transfer it to the fridge until you’re reading to roll it out and make the Banketstaaf.
  • To Re-Crisp Leftover Banketstaaf: Place the pastry on a baking tray and bake at 350F until warm, about 8 minutes.

Nutrition

Calories: 481kcal | Carbohydrates: 64g | Protein: 9g | Fat: 23g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 9g | Trans Fat: 1g | Sodium: 60mg | Potassium: 120mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 51g | Vitamin A: 4IU | Calcium: 64mg | Iron: 2mg

Nutritional information is automatically calculated and should be used as an approximate.

Course: Breakfast, Brunch, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: Dutch
Keyword: Almond Pastries, Banket, Banket Recipe, Banketstaaf, Banketstaaf Recipe, Dutch Almond Pastry, Dutch Christmas Log, Dutch Pastry, Marzipan-Filled Puff Pastry

Share it with me on Instagram and leave a comment to let me know your thoughts!

christmas dutch banket recipe pin

This post was first published on An Edible Mosaic on December 21, 2010. I updated it with more information on December 22, 2023.

Faith, author of An Edible Mosaic.
About Faith

I’m the writer, recipe developer, photographer, and food stylist behind this blog. I love finding the human connection through something we all do every day: eat! Food is a common ground that we can all relate to, and our tables tell a story. It’s my goal to inspire you to get in the kitchen, try something new, and find a favorite you didn’t know you had.

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Recipe Rating




55 Comments

  1. Ollie Smith says:

    Made the Marzipan….didn’t set up thick enough to use for logs.
    Maybe I need to heat it higher than 230?
    It tasted great…but was too soft.

    1. Hi Ollie,

      I’m so sorry the recipe is giving you trouble, let’s see if we can get to the bottom of it.

      Here are my thoughts:

      1. I wonder if there’s a size difference in the eggs we used? I used “large” eggs (about 30-33 grams per egg white), but depending where you are, our eggs might be very different sizes.
      2. Did you make sure to stir the mixture for 3 minutes on the heat after adding the almond flour and egg whites? The mixture should thicken quite a bit during this process as liquid evaporates off.
      3. Did you make it on a humid day? I’ve noticed climate and weather can play a very big role, with humid conditions adding more moisture to the marzipan.
      4. After it was made, did you let it cool before using?

      Something I noticed about homemade marzipan is that the longer you leave it and the colder it is, the harder it becomes. If all else fails, maybe try making it a couple days in advance (storing it in the fridge to help it dry out a bit quicker), and then seeing how it goes making the pastry logs?

      I hope this helps! Please feel free to reach out again if you have any questions.

  2. 5 stars
    just made the marzipan. Didn’t strain it. Turned out well I’m impressed. Never made it before.

  3. Marguerite says:

    I made the marzipan paste, and it tastes amazing, but it’s a bit dry (like dry, crumbly play doh). What do you think I should do? My instinct would be to knead in a few drops of water at a time until it becomes smoother (like fresh play doh)? Let me know if you have a better idea. My husband is Dutch and his grandma made this every year for Christmas. I’m going to bake this to surprise his family when they’re here for Christmas :) Thanks so much!!

    1. Marguerite, Thanks so much for leaving a comment, I’m so happy you’re enjoying the marzipan! When I make homemade marzipan, I find it always dries out after a couple days in the fridge. I typically knead in a little bit of egg white until it comes together again. I’ve never tried re-hydrating it with water, but that could work! Another tip, make sure not to knead in too much liquid, otherwise the log won’t hold its shape well when baked. That is such a lovely Christmas surprise for your husband’s family, I hope they enjoy it! :)

  4. We spent a few days in solvang and I had this Xmas pastry and it was the best pastry I’ve ever eaten in my life! Unfortunately I only ordered a slice instead of the whole log as I just wanted something for the long ride home. It was the next day when I finally had it and I was shocked at how amazingly good it was.
    I’m very happy to have this recipe, thanks
    Georgie

  5. Jess @ Flying on Jess Fuel says:

    This sounds amazing! I LOOOOOVE almond croissants and anything and everything marzipan, frangipane, amaretto…. yum!

  6. This I do know as a Dutch person :) and it’s actually
    eaten in the whole of december, also around Sinterklaas, which is some-what like Santa Claus, as in he brings gifts to children, although he puts them in their shoes (not in a stocking) and he rides on a horse, for which the children leave carrots and water near their shoe… Just in case you wanted to know something about Dutch culture ;)

  7. les 2 gourmands says:

    thanks for the share, a recipe between french traditional galette des rois & also a bit of strudel, very attractive !!!

  8. Libby, the very very hungry caterpillar says:

    Wow, that looks like a German stollen… only much nicer!

  9. Ooooo, almost missed this recipe! Thank goodness I didn’t. This looks and sounds divine! We love almond flavored desserts. I really don’t feel like making marzipan but I do have some almond paste and am wondering if that would work.

    Thanks for sharing Faith!
    ~ingrid

  10. blackbookkitchendiaries says:

    i love making marzipan too and this recipe does sounds good to me. I think the pastry looks just prefect! thank you for sharing this and have a nice day.

  11. This looks amazing, and a bit like a pastry I’ve been anxious to recreate. Good thing I’ve got homemade pistachio and almond marzipan in the freezer!

  12. This looks so good! I agree with you 100% on making the marzipan; night and day in taste, I think! I used to work in a restaurant and made some to make crescent shaped cookies studded with almonds. We would use huge quantities of almond meal, your recipe is perfect for home use. Question: where do you get your almond meal?

    1. Joumana, I get my almond meal right in the regular grocery store (Wegmans, usually, but I’ve even seen it at Walmart in the gluten-free baking area); I use the Bob’s Red Mill brand. You’re so right, it is absolutely night and day in taste!

  13. Lentil Breakdown says:

    Love how Joan said “warsh.” Great mental image. Almost as good as seeing that marzipan! Happy New Year!

  14. nancy at good food matters says:

    Fabulous, Faith! This looks like it is not too difficult, and really stunning. How nice that a comment from years ago helped you to tweak the recipe.

    Love the story about Joan—ladies like her keep the world spinning round—

  15. Priscilla - She's Cookin' says:

    I have fond memories of working with ladies like Joan and, like you, I love heirloom recipes and the traditions behind them. This flaky pastry looks like it would melt in your mouth! Happy holidays, Faith!

  16. marla {family fresh cooking} says:

    Now this is quite the Christmas treat! Sounds like working in the pizza place was a blast. Thanks for sharing this Dutch dessert with us :) XO

  17. sarah (the SHU box) says:

    this literally takes the cake :) looks AMAZING! have a wonderful holiday.

  18. i usually see marzipan and immediately think ‘ick’ but you’ve done some magical work here! very nice, faith. :)

  19. Crazy Sweet Life (Brianna) says:

    This looks amazing! I’ll have to try this one out!

  20. Faith, this is one of my favourite pastries. I was more accustomed with buying these at the French patisserie and had no idea of its Dutch Christmas treat origins.
    I can have this for breakfast anytime of the week.
    You did a superb pastry!!!

    Thanks for sharing something I’m truly willing to try making myself.

    Flavourful wishes,
    Claudia

  21. Angie's Recipes says:

    I just made some cooked marzipan two days ago…and your X’mas log recipe comes just in time!

  22. A Canadian Foodie says:

    FAITH!!!
    I think I’m in LOVE! Marzipan and puff pastry? Oh, convince me? Could it really be good???? Your first photograph knocked me flat. Truly. I also make my own marzipan and adore anything with maripan in it. I cannot express my gratitude to you for having met dear Joan and warshed a few dishes with her. Obviously, she left a huge impression on you, and so did her baked treats. Lucky me as you have introduced me to a recipe that I have never heard of, nor would have thought would work. I would have thought the marzipan on its own in the pastry would be too heavy… to sweet… too much. But, that is, if I had even thought about it. But, now that I see it. I want to drop EVERYTHING and make it. And, I will. Today. Later.
    I am happy to find this other recipe for marzipan as it is truly different than most, so thank you to you and Qunigal from me, too.
    See> Already I am learning ( alittle slow on the up take) that when I see a recipe from Miss Faith arriving into my mail box, to take the time needed to enjoy the read!!!
    MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU!!!!
    Big hugs and wishes or warmth, love and happiness over the holidays!
    :)
    Valerie

  23. You seem to be opening up more on your blog and I love it! This was a great back story and the marzipan loaves look incredible!

  24. I am crazy for anything with almond paste. And this looks so divine, what with the big, bodacious center of it inside flaky, buttery pastry. YUM!

  25. Betty @ Scrambled Hen Fruit says:

    I have read about this lovely Christmas treat, but have never had it. Yours looks so tempting I may have to try it! I love your recipe for marzipan as well- it’s not so easy to find around here. I hope you have a merry Christmas!

  26. Maria @ Scandifoodie says:

    That looks incredibly delicious! Happy Holidays!

  27. Anna Johnston says:

    Without a doubt, it was the hectic frantic pace where ‘the team’ clicked into automatic that hooked me too Faith & I’m sure I worked with Joan (although she was possibly called Josie in her other incarnation ;)
    Lovin’ the Banketstaaf – fabulous :)

  28. I worked in a restaurant by the beach when I was in high school. It would get so crazy busy on weekend nights! I still have waitress nightmares occasionally :) The pastry looks amazing!

  29. Katherine: Unemployed says:

    wow I am amazed at your talent. This looks great!

  30. Amazing! I’d love a slice with a cup of coffee. Love that you made your own marzipan, too!

  31. Michelle @ Find Your Balance says:

    In high school I worked at Friendly’s and a chinese restaurant. Ha!

  32. This looks amazing,Faith! I love all your pictures! Happy holidays to you and your husband!

  33. Ah marzipan, I made it for this time in my cooking class. Oh what a disaster it was!

    Your recipe looks delicious.

  34. Make your own marzipan?!!! Really?!!! I had not idea it was as simple as your recipe seems to indicate. I am VERY excited about this. Can you tell. I’m not sure there is anything better in the world than marzipan with dark chocolate. Send a virtual cookie tray my way please! ASAP! The pastry looks divine!

  35. What a sweet post, Faith! How is Joan doing now?

    I remember working at Cold Stone’s when I was in high school, and I loved every minute of it, too.

  36. BeadedTail says:

    I love anything with almonds or almond flavors and this just looks so delicious! Must.have.this!

  37. I agree with you. This is the best time to share this beautiful recipe with us. Marzipan is a project I intend to focus on next year.

  38. Blond Duck says:

    I’m not talented to make marzipan or pizza! I’ll have to drool in envy.

  39. 5 Star Foodie says:

    This would be 5 Star Foodie Junior’s ideal sweet treat – puff pastry and almonds are her most favorite! I will definitely have to make it for her!

  40. That is so out of this world! A delightful treat. Marzipan is one of my favorite fillings…

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  41. I love marzipan, this one is for me :) Diane

  42. Amazing story and great recipe (my first job was also in an italian restaurant, alas no Joan type!) I was just thinking I wanted to make something with marzipan, this is just the thing!

  43. Joan sure sounds like quite the character. I love listening to stories from “women of a certain age”, they always have the best stories to share of past experiences. These Dutch Christmas Logs look scrumptious. I love desserts and dishes made with puff pastry. Adding almonds was the perfect finishing touch to your beautiful dessert. Thank you for sharing both recipes, Faith.

  44. Heavenly Housewife says:

    Ooooh, this looks stunning. Having something like this would be real trouble for my diet. I don’t think i’d be able to resist.
    *kisses* HH

  45. Lori@FakeFoodFree says:

    These look incredible! I’m so glad you shared it. They remind me of the Mozart Croissants we get in Vienna. I can’t wait to give them a try.

  46. Great story, Joan sounds like a real hoot! The Pastry looks fabulous, perfect for the holiday menu!

  47. This is a lovely Christmas log. Silly side note, when our Dachshund, Arthur, lies under our Christmas tree, we call him our little Yule Log. Your post made me think of that. ;)

  48. I loved hearing about this precious woman and the influence she had in your life. It sounds like she was a pleasure to know! And I love that you were able to create a recipe that honored some of the treats she used to bring in. This christmas log looks just delicious! Thanks for sharing, sweet friend. Have a beauty-filled Tuesday!

  49. Evelyne@CheapEthnicEatz says:

    Well, I was just going to do my holiday recipe list this morning and I was looking for the ‘little dessert’ my aunt asked for the 25th…I found it. Thank you! Marzipan RULES!

  50. This looks so flaky and delicious! I never would think to put marzipan in puff pastry.

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