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Whipped yogurt with fresh raspberry sauce and sumac is a refreshing sweet and tangy way to dress up yogurt for breakfast or a light dessert. To whip yogurt, you only need 1 ingredient – yogurt! – and it’s so easy to make! I will teach you how to strain plain yogurt to make whipped yogurt, or you can use thick, creamy Greek yogurt instead and skip the straining step.

whipped yogurt with raspberry sauce and sumac

I’m often surprised at how delicious the simplest foods are.

Fresh strawberries drizzled with dark chocolate.

Just-baked bread spread with butter.

Juicy ripe pear slices with creamy blue cheese and a touch of honey.

Onions and garlic sautéed in olive oil and seasoned with salt and pepper.

And let’s not forget a humble childhood favorite, peanut butter and jelly.

These are the pairings – too simple to even be considered recipes – that are staples in my kitchen but rarely see the light of day on my blog.

This whipped yogurt is one such recipe that’s actually just a method, and not really a recipe at all.

overhead spread of bowls of whipped yogurt with fresh raspberries and raspberry sauce

Strained Yogurt vs. Whipped Yogurt

If you’ve never made strained yogurt (also known as labneh or yogurt cheese) you’ll be surprised at how easy it is to make. The point is just to strain out the whey, and you can do this either by pressing the yogurt or suspending it in cheesecloth.

The resulting strained yogurt is tangy with a smooth and creamy consistency that’s even a bit thicker than Greek yogurt.

Here we take strained yogurt one step further and whip it until it is light and fluffy.

One of my favorite things about strained yogurt is that you can take it sweet or savory depending on what you top it with. My hubby (who is from the Middle East) likes it savory with drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and a sprinkle of za’atar, scooped up with warm Arabic flatbread. Served this way, strained yogurt (aka yogurt cheese or labneh) is a great appetizer.

After trying whipped yogurt with honey-muddled raspberries inspired by the incredibly talented Ksenia of At the Immigrant’s Table, I think I might be convinced that sweet is the way to go.

bowl of fluffy yogurt with raspberry sauce

The Collaboration: Ksenia Prints of At the Immigrant’s Table

I’ve been a fan of Ksenia’s work for a while now, and you may remember that last year we worked together on a collaborative post (where I shared my recipe for Foul Mudammas and she shared her recipe for Green Shakshuka).

If you’re not familiar with Ksenia’s blog, let me say that her photography is awe-inspiring. Her recipes are real food-focused, nourishing, and delicious.

I visit her blog for more than good eats and beautiful photography though. Ksenia has a way with words that gives deeper meaning to food. I couldn’t be more excited for Ksenia about the recent release of her first e-cookbook!

Middle Eastern Small Plates by Ksenia Prints

Ksenia’s cooking philosophy is beautiful. She embraces good quality ingredients paired with even better company.

Mostly simple, but sometimes slightly more involved meals that nourish body and soul, and are redolent with nostalgia.

Food that invites big smiles and messy kitchens. Food with heart that tells a story.

Looking through her cookbook was mesmerizing. My only challenge (of course) was deciding what to make first!

I imagined the crisp lightness and nutty crunch of Gluten-Free Almond Lavosh Crackers.

Gluten-Free Almond Lavosh Crackers
Gluten-Free Almond Lavosh Crackers from Middle Eastern Small Plates; image courtesy of Ksenia Prints.

The depth of flavor in what looks like the ultimate condiment, vibrant Tomato and Pepper Matboucha (also known as cooked salad).

Tomato and Pepper Matboucha
Tomato and Pepper Matboucha from Middle Eastern Small Plates; image courtesy of Ksenia Prints.

The brilliant combination of flavors and textures in Eggplant Rolls with Feta, Walnuts, and Pomegranate.

Eggplant Rolls with Feta, Walnuts, and Pomegranate
Eggplant Rolls with Feta, Walnuts, and Pomegranate from Middle Eastern Small Plates; image courtesy of Ksenia Prints.

The allure of earthy mushrooms and onions in Mushroom Bourekas beckoned to me, as I can rarely resist mushrooms especially if flaky crust is involved.

So many delicious options!

how to make whipped yogurt or whipped greek yogurt

Easy Whipped Yogurt with Fresh Raspberry Sauce and Sumac

In the end, it was the Whipped Goat Labneh with Sumac and Pomegranate that won out. However, the recipe I’m sharing here has a couple of my own twists!

When I made it, pomegranate was just coming out of season and I couldn’t find one for love nor money. I thought about what fruit would be good, and decided on red raspberries, mainly for their stunning color. To add a touch of sweetness, I thought muddling the raspberries with honey would be perfect.

I kept sumac in the recipe, and I’m glad I did because its bright lemony flavor perked everything else up. I also went with Ksenia’s suggestion of using sheep’s milk yogurt, and was pleased at the refreshing tang.

Not counting the time for the yogurt to strain (because let’s be honest, it babysits itself overnight in the fridge), this comes together in just 10 minutes.

If you’re wondering why you would want to whip yogurt, I’ll tell you! It’s a complete transformation. Whipped yogurt is fluffy and almost airy with a light, creamy mouthfeel. It’s beautiful and almost whimsical, making something as ordinary as yogurt feel special.

Feel free to take this recipe and make it your own. You can use just about any kind of fruit you like (mango puree is also wonderful and makes a striking contrast in color). And you can adjust the sweetness to suit your tastes.

close up of bowl of whipped greek yogurt

Ingredients in Whipped Yogurt with Fresh Raspberry Sauce

In this section, the ingredients are explained. Note that this recipe is for whipped yogurt without cream because we simply don’t need it! For the full recipe (including ingredient amounts), please see the recipe card below.

Whipped Yogurt Ingredients

  • Yogurt – plain, unsweetened yogurt is what we’re going for here, and you can use sheep or goat’s milk yogurt instead of cow’s milk yogurt for even more tang

Fresh Raspberry Sauce Ingredients

  • Red raspberries – you can use frozen raspberries in a pinch, or go with any type of berries you like
  • Honey – if available, use raw, local honey for the benefits; or you can use any sweetener you like
  • Sea salt – just a pinch enhances the flavor of the berries so much
  • Sumac – this brick-red spice adds a punch of tart lemony flavor, so use it sparingly
muddled raspberries with honey

How to Make Whipped Yogurt

Step 1: How to Strain Yogurt:

You can strain yogurt in one of two methods, pressing it or suspending it. Both method works equally well to remove the whey.

To Press Yogurt:

  1. Place a strainer inside a bowl, and line the strainer with cheesecloth or coffee filters so that they hang over the outside of the strainer.
  2. Scoop the yogurt into the lined strainer and fold the cheesecloth or coffee filters over the top of the yogurt.
  3. Cover with plastic wrap and put a plate on top; put something heavy on top of the plate to help press the whey out of the yogurt.
  4. Let the yogurt sit like this in the fridge for 12 to 24 hours, or until it reaches your desired thickness.

To Suspend Yogurt:

  1. Line a bowl with 2 pieces of cheesecloth, place the yogurt in the center, and tie the cheesecloth closed.
  2. If the weather is cool, hang the cheesecloth over the sink for 8 hours or if the weather is hot, hang the cheesecloth in the fridge for 8 hours with a bowl underneath to collect the whey.

Step 2: How to Whip Yogurt:

Use a handheld electric mixer to whip the strained yogurt until light and fluffy (about 2 minutes).

Whipped Greek Yogurt

If you want to make this entire process even easier, you can make whipped yogurt with Greek yogurt or labneh. (Labneh is yogurt cheese, which is available at Arabic and Middle Eastern grocery stores.)

However, to use Greek yogurt, look for a brand that has a thick and creamy texture and isn’t watery. (Because if your Greek yogurt is watery, you’ll have to strain it first, the same way you’d have to strain regular yogurt!)

A couple of my favorite Greek yogurts for making whipped yogurt are FAGE Total 5% Milkfat Plain Greek Yogurt and Cabot Whole Milk Plain Greek Yogurt 10% Milkfat.

front view of bowl of whipped yogurt with raspberry sauce swirled in

How to Serve Whipped Yogurt

Serve fluffy whipped yogurt topped with fresh raspberry sauce for breakfast or as a light dessert on its own. If you’re in a time crunch, you can swirl in your favorite jam instead of muddling fresh raspberries. Or just top it with fresh berries and a drizzle of honey!

You can dollop whipped yogurt on pound cake along with a fresh berry sauce for a simple spring or summer dessert.

Or swirl maple-sweetened pumpkin puree into creamy whipped yogurt and top it with a sprinkle of pecans and a dusting of cinnamon for a gorgeous fall treat.

The possibilities are endless!

More Unusual Ways to Use Yogurt That Are Absolutely Delicious

overhead view of whipped yogurt with sumac and fresh raspberry sauce on wooden table

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Whipped Yogurt with Fresh Raspberry Sauce and Sumac

Prep Time10 minutes
Cook Time0 minutes
Other Time8 hours
Yields: 2 servings
Whipped yogurt with fresh raspberry sauce and sumac is a refreshing sweet and tangy way to dress up yogurt for breakfast or a light dessert. To whip yogurt, you only need 1 ingredient – yogurt! – and it’s so easy to make! I will teach you how to strain plain yogurt to make whipped yogurt, or you can use thick, creamy Greek yogurt instead and skip the straining step.

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Ingredients
 

Whipped Yogurt:

  • 16 ounces plain unsweetened yogurt use sheep or goat’s milk yogurt instead of cow’s milk yogurt for even more tang

Fresh Raspberry Sauce:

  • 3 ounces red raspberries
  • 1 tablespoon honey if possible use raw, local honey
  • 1 pinch sea salt
  • 1 pinch sumac for garnish (optional)

Instructions
 

For the Whipped Yogurt:

  • You first need to strain the yogurt. To do so, you can either press it or suspending it. Here are both methods.
  • To Strain the Yogurt by Pressing: Place a strainer inside a bowl, and line the strainer with cheesecloth or coffee filters so that they hang over the outside of the strainer. Scoop the yogurt into the lined strainer and fold the cheesecloth or coffee filters over the top of the yogurt. Cover with plastic wrap and put a plate on top; put something heavy on top of the plate to help press the whey out of the yogurt. Let the yogurt sit like this in the fridge for 12 to 24 hours, or until it reaches your desired thickness.
  • To Strain the Yogurt by Suspending: Line a bowl with 2 pieces of cheesecloth, place the yogurt in the center, and tie the cheesecloth closed. If the weather is cool, hang the cheesecloth over the sink for 8 hours or if the weather is hot, hang the cheesecloth in the fridge for 8 hours with a bowl underneath to collect the whey.
  • Once the yogurt is strained, use a handheld electric mixer to whip it until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes.

For the Fresh Raspberry Sauce:

  • To muddle the raspberries, add the raspberries, honey, and a pinch of salt to a bowl and mash everything together with a fork.
  • Serve the whipped yogurt with the raspberry sauce swirled on top and a pinch of sumac.

Notes

  • Storage: Once the yogurt is strained, you can store it in a covered container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks before whipping it. After making whipped yogurt, you can store it in a covered container in the fridge for up to 5 days (but for best texture, I recommend whipping it right before you want to serve it).
  • What To Do With the Whey Leftover From Straining Yogurt: You can use it to make smoothies, overnight oatmeal, or add it to baked goods instead of milk.
  • Greek Whipped Yogurt: If you want to make this entire process even easier, you can make whipped yogurt with Greek yogurt or labneh. (Labneh is yogurt cheese, which is available at Arabic and Middle Eastern grocery stores.) To use Greek yogurt, look for a brand that has a thick and creamy texture and isn’t watery. (If your Greek yogurt is watery, you’ll have to strain it first, the same way you’d have to strain regular yogurt!) A couple of my favorite Greek yogurts for making whipped yogurt are FAGE Total 5% Milkfat Plain Greek Yogurt and Cabot Whole Milk Plain Greek Yogurt 10% Milkfat.

Nutrition

Calories: 332kcal | Carbohydrates: 58g | Protein: 11g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 29mg | Sodium: 322mg | Potassium: 360mg | Fiber: 0.02g | Sugar: 56g | Vitamin A: 225IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 276mg | Iron: 0.2mg

Nutritional information is automatically calculated and should be used as an approximate.

Course: Appetizer, Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: Arabic and Middle Eastern
Keyword: Strained Yogurt, Whipped Yogurt

Share it with me on Instagram and leave a comment to let me know your thoughts!

whipped yogurt pin
Faith, author of An Edible Mosaic.
About Faith

I’m the writer, recipe developer, photographer, and food stylist behind this blog. I love finding the human connection through something we all do every day: eat! Food is a common ground that we can all relate to, and our tables tell a story. It’s my goal to inspire you to get in the kitchen, try something new, and find a favorite you didn’t know you had.

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14 Comments

  1. I’ve only ever had sumac in savory dishes, but this sounds just perfect! I’ve got everything on hand to make it tomorrow – hello breakfast!

  2. All of your simplest foods got me hungry, and like you mentioned, many would never make it on the blog, but are treasured favorites to eat. Some things just don’t get shared, can’t be shared. Some things are just for us. :)
    Thicker than Greek yogurt? I must try the method sometime. I can’t really say that I’ve had it in a savory fashion like Mike likes it, but when I read sumac in your recipe I had to read. This looks delicious and what a great combination of flavors. Thanks of sth link to her site as well. :)

  3. Faith, I have honestly gone through about 10 hues of red while reading this post. It’s such a pleasure seeing my dish transformed into something else that is both reminiscent and so uniquely different from the original. If I have a way with words, then you have a way with feelings – and particularly capturing them in foods. This dish just softly whispers of love in that way that only a quickly prepared breakfast for someone else can. Love the colours, and love your twist on the original. You’re the best!!! xoxo

  4. THE FLAVORS in this! Wow. I am obsessed with learning about new ways to use sumac and this is headed straight to the must-make list! Love how simple and fresh the flavors are.

  5. I love the idea of making my own yogurt because all the ones in the store have some much sugar in them! Great recipe and I love the idea of raspberries and sumac!

  6. Heather Kinnaird says:

    such a pretty dish (and I’m sure just as delicious)

  7. This looks fantastic! Absolutely delicious and perfect as a snack, dessert or even breakfast!

  8. I love Ksenia’s work too! She has such a creative energy and her recipes are super flavorful, as well as nourishing. All the elements of this recipe sound like a match made in heaven. I have never whipped yogurt, but now I must!

    xo
    Amanda

  9. A delicious dessert! I love the fact that you’ve used sumac.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  10. This looks amazing, perfect for breakfast or even a snack! I love it!

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